The Forfeited: The Carrick Lairds at the Battle of Bothwell Bridge

The ‘Carrick men’ at the battle of Bothwell Bridge were among the strongest supporters of John Welsh, the former minister of Irongray, in his endeavours to moderate the demands of their militant brethren. Some of them were forfeited for their part in the rebellion after the rising was defeated.

DrummochreenDrummochreen © Mary and Angus Hogg and licensed for reuse.

1. John MacAlexander, younger, of Drummochreen, Dailly parish.
‘John MacAlexander of Dumochrein’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684 as ‘John MacAlexander, younger of Dumochrin, forfeited’. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 213.)

He may have lived at the old house of Drummochreen, rather than the more modern farm to the north.

Map of old house of Drummochreen             Aerial View of old house of Drummochreen

Pingerroch

2. John MacJarrow in Pingerroch, Barr parish.
‘John MacJarrow of Pingerrach’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684 as ‘John Macjarrow, of Pengeroch, forfeited’ under Barr parish. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

According to Roy’s map of the 1750s, Pingerroch lay on the southern bank of the Pingerroch Burn. The Canmore website lists three structures, including a ruined farmstead, in the area, but none of them appear to be Roy’s Pingerroch.

What remains of Pingerroch may be outlined in trees.

Aerial View of Pingerroch             Street View of Pingerroch

Map of Pingerroch

Alexander Peden preached by the Pingerroch Burn on Auchensoul Hill. The large boulder on which Peden preached is probably still in situ, but has not been identified since the nineteenth century.

Barr

3. Thomas MacJarrow of Barr, Barr parish.

‘Thomas MacJarrow of Barr’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He possibly resided in Barr, around the kirk. The settlement was also known as Barr Kirk.

Map of Barr

However, ‘Bar’, later known as Nether Barr and Upper Barr, is also strong candidate for where he lived. Bar lies just to the north of Barr Kirk.

Map of Nether and Upper Barr

4. Henry MacJarrow of Alton Albany, Barr parish.

‘Henry MacGarroch of Alton Albany’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

His name is clarified on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684, to which his name was appended as ‘‘———-‘ Macjarrow, of Alti-albany’. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

Henry MacJarrow probably lived the predecessor of Alton Albany Farm.

Map of Alton Albany

Dinmurchie

5. Gilbert McIlwraith of Dinmurchie, Barr parish.
‘Gilbert MacIlraith of Dumorchie’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684, as ‘Gilbert Macilwraith, of Dumorchie’. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

A building at risk now stands at Dinmurchie

Map of Dinmurchie        Aerial View of Dinmurchie

Street View towards Dinmurchie

Benan

6. George Maclure of Benan, Barr parish.
‘George MacLure of Bennan’ is mentioned as forfeited in a letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684 as ‘George Maclure, of Bennan’ under Barr parish. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

‘Bennan’ is now called Benan and lies in Barr parish.

Map of Benan            Aerial View of Benan

KillantringanKillantringan © James Allan and licensed for reuse.

7. John MacMichan of Killantringan, Colmonell parish.
[John] MacMichan, son to […] MacMichan of Killstinnian; is also mentioned as forfeited in the letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

He appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684 as ‘John MacMeiken, of Kill St Ninians, forfeited’. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

‘Kill St Ninians’ is now known as Killantringan. The names Ninian and Ringan are interchangeable.

Map of Killantringan                 Street View of Killantringan

The Barrhill Martyrs were killed near his former home.

Auchenflower

8. Hugh MacIlwraith of Auchenflower, Ballantrae parish.
‘[Hugh] MacIlraith of Auchenflower’ is also mentioned as forfeited in the letter of 8 October, 1681. (Wodrow, History, III, 248.)

MacIlwraith was captured and ordered to be executed in the Grassmarket in April, 1682. However, he was reprieved. He may have escaped. (Wodrow, History, III, 410.)

‘Hugh MacIlwrath, of Auchinflour’ appears on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684 under Ballantrae parish. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 212.)

Map of Auchenflower               Street View of Auchenflower

9. Thomas Ferguson of Finnarts, Ballantrae parish.

Thomas Ferguson of Finnarts was forfeited in absentia on 9 January, 1682.

Map of Finnarts              Aerial View of Finnarts

An old man, he was suspected of providing funds for the Presbyterian rising of 1679. He had fled to Antrim in Ireland. His forfeited lands were gifted to a ‘Captain Seton’. His forfeiture was reversed by the Scottish parliament in 1690. (Wodrow, History, III, 407-8; Paterson, History of the Counties of Ayr and Wigton, II, 101-2.)

10. Mr [John] Binning of Dalvennan, Straiton parish.

Binning was forfeited on 6 July, 1680. (Wodrow, History, III, 180; RPS, 1685/4/125.)

Map of Dalvennan                Street View of Dalvennan

Binning was a member of the United Societies and taught Latin to their ‘expectants’, i.e., trainees for the ministry, between May to October, 1683. He was married to Hanna Keir, who corresponded with both James Renwick and Robert Hamilton. A letter from James Renwick to Binning was intercepted in late 1685.

At some point, Binning fled to Ireland. His wife probably joined him there in 1687. Binning’s forfeiture was reversed in 1690, but legal complications ensured he never recovered his estate and he remained in poverty.

[John] Whiteford, younger of Blairquhan, Straiton parish.
Presbyterian sources record that [John] Whiteford, younger of Blairquhan, was involved in the Rising. There is no record of his forfeiture, but he was one of the Carrick men who supported John Welsh in his attempts to moderate the aims of the rising on 8 June, 1679.

Map of Blairquhan              Aerial View of Blairquhan

In 1685, Blairquhan was garrisoned by Cornet James Dundas of His Majesty’s Regiment of Dragoons.

For the forfeited Wigtownshire Lairds, see here.

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Text © Copyright Dr Mark Jardine. All Rights Reserved. Please link to or retweet this post, but do not reblog without the express permission of the author @drmarkjardine

~ by drmarkjardine on December 8, 2013.

2 Responses to “The Forfeited: The Carrick Lairds at the Battle of Bothwell Bridge”

  1. […] Well lies close to the home of Hugh MacIlwraith of Auchenflower, a Carrick laird forfeited for his part in the battle of Bothwell […]

  2. […] The mistress of the house was possibly the wife of John MacJarrow, a forfeited landholder. […]

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